BLF calls for unity of black political parties

The black majority desire black unity to advance the revolution to end suffering. The enemy is united but black people are divided. A new opportunity to work towards black unity has presented itself again as a consequence of the position the Black First Land First (BLF) has taken against the war talk of Johann Rupert. The responses from the leaders and progressive organizations to stand with BLF is an important step in the direction of unity.

BLF acknowledges the revolutionary stance of the National Freedom Party (NFP), its solidarity message is unambiguous. We draw strength from such clarity and revolutionary stance. BLF knows it’s not alone as it faces the enemy of our people. In the NFP we have a family.

BLF also acknowledges the stance taken by Economic Freedom Fighter (EFF) to defend the correct position taken by our movement against the shocking cowardice of the African National Conference (ANC) of Ramaphosa. The ANC under Ramaphosa is unashamed agents of White Monopoly Capital (WMC). The ANC chooses to stand with Johann Rupert as he calls for black-on-black violence. This shows that the ANC under Ramaphosa is an anti-black party that is a danger to black liberation. The ANC of Ramaphosa has chosen to isolate itself from black people.

We can never defeat the enemy divided. The enemy has manipulated our differences for far too long. This has weakened black people. BLF calls for an all black political parties imbizo before the 2019 elections. Our hope is that all the progressive parties of black people would cut ties with white alliances and partnerships for real black unity for land and freedom.

We hope as a first step all leaders must initiate their own peace talks. There is nothing stopping EFF leader, Julius Malema from approaching President Jacob Zuma to ask for forgiveness. The same applies between BLF President, Mngxitama and Malema. Surely the differences between these leaders are not more important than the liberation of our people.

The enemy is united and determined. If blacks don’t unite and fight, we shall each be defeated and destroyed. Our unity now is a matter of life and death. BLF calls for a principled unity based on a minimum program of action which we consider to be the Radical Economic Transformation agenda.

We hope all black parties would consider the call for an all black political parties imbizo before the 2019 elections. Unity doesn’t mean stopping the necessary critique of each other, it simply means working towards something much bigger and much more important.

Viva black unity!

Issued by Black First Land First, National Coordinating Committee (BLF NCC)

13 December 2018

Black First Land First Email:[email protected]

Zanele Lwana
(Deputy President)
Cell: +27799867225

Lindsay Maasdorp
(National Spokesperson)
Cell: +27 79 915 2957

Brian Tloubatla
(Head of Media & Communications)
Cell: +27 82 216 7664

We have been duped by the EFF’s motion on Land Expropriation Without Compensation

It takes 410 days from the introduction to commencement of a Bill. The introduction of the bill itself is generally not in its final form. It goes through a process of “public consultation, line by line scrutiny and consideration by both the National Assembly and National Council of Provinces, resulting in amendments”. Furthermore, the time it takes to go through the required stages is dependent inter alia on “the length of the Bill, its importance, costing, complexity and how controversial it is”.

To this end the Protection of State Information Bill, because of its controversy resulted in Parliament taking 1344 days to pass it into law.¬†However a bill can be fast tracked. In this context a Bill which is urgent or introduced as a result of a crisis “may be passed in a matter of days”. To this end as pointed out by the Parliamentary Monitoring Group (PMG) on its website, the “National Assembly and the NCOP amended the Sexual Offences Act in three days (in 2012) in response to a Western Cape High Court ruling which deemed some sections of the Act unconstitutional”.

The signing of the Bill by the President into law is not automatic. In this regard he “has the opportunity to assess the constitutionality of a bill and can refer it back to Parliament for reconsideration if he has any reservations”. Also “[w]hen exercising this right, the President seeks counsel and considers submissions and petitions made to him” and this sometimes “includes listening to concerns from beyond the country such as foreign governments and international bodies”.

Once a bill is signed it is triggered into force but it generally “takes some time for it to come into operation”. Moreover, “most provisions in an Act will either come into operation within a set period after assent or at a time fixed by the government” which in turn “gives the government and those stakeholders who are directly affected by the Act time to plan accordingly”. In some instances “an Act may require certain actions to be taken by the Department” prior to it being implemented. In this context, for example, “subordinate legislation (regulations, determinations, rules) may have to be prepared, approved and gazetted”.

Here’s an historical account of the time periods involved with some of the Bills:

Shortest time: introduction to commencement

“21 days: Special Adjustments Appropriation Bill 2007

27 days: Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters Amendment Act Amendment Bill 2012

30 days: Regulation of Interception of Communications-Related Information Amendment Bill 2010”

Longest time: introduction and commencement

2812 days: Immigration Amendment Bill 2006

2227 days: Mineral and Petroleum Resource Development Amendment Bill 2007

2094 days: Firearms Control Amendment Bill 2006

The recent motion by the EFF for Land Expropriation without Compensation (LEWC) which was passed in the National Assembly with the majority vote of the ANC and which referred the issue for review to the Constitutional Review Committee is an event that is located at the very beginning of the above process. Hence it will take at least 410 days before the Bill is enacted for commencement. This effectively takes commencement of the Bill beyond the date of the 2019 General Elections.

Moreover both the ANC’s and EFF’s post parliamentary motion clarifications can be summed up in the declaration by EFF leader Julius Malema in allying white fears. To this end Malema says that all land must be expropriated by the state, no-one will own any land – everyone will be allocated land for use. Land from those who are farming and using land productively must not be taken from them. So basically all land (which is all productive land) in the hands of whites must remain in white hands. So while ownership of all land will vest in the state, the use and enjoyment patterns will remain in favour of whites. What this effectively means is that for whites to lose ownership of land makes no difference – they will still dominate and hence have hegemony of this means of production.

All this suggests that both the EFF and the ANC and others who adopted the LEWC motion, have no intention of fast tracking the process – including setting aside the current adopted motion on LEWC and instead finalising the Expropriation Bill that President Zuma returned to the National Assembly in 2016 for further action. The referred Expropriation Bill can be finalised in two months as opposed to the current motion which if realized into a bill will take at least 410 days for commencement.

Furthermore those adopting the motion acted in bad faith knowing full well that:

– the content of the motion does not mean return all land to the black majority without compensation. It means blacks will get reject unproductive land while whites retain all the productive land; and

– the time it will take for the adopted motion to be processed into a Bill and then passed into law will take us well beyond the 2019 General Elections by which time blacks would have already been duped into voting them back into power and it will be too late to reverse their votes.

In all of the above circumstances it is clear that there will be no actual LEWC via the motion referred to the Constitutional Review Committee for review – note review doesn’t mean amendment.

Learn the cold and liberating truth! Land occupations is the only way to real LEWC.

#VoteBLF #VoteRet

Issued by the National Coordinating Committee of Black First Land First (BLF NCC)

3 March 2018

Black First Land First Email:[email protected]
Facebook: Black First Land First

Twitter: @black1stland1st
Website: www.blf.org.za

Zanele Lwana
(Deputy President)
Cell: +27799867225

Lindsay Maasdorp
(National Spokesperson)
Cell: +27 79 915 2957

Brian Tloubatla
(Deputy National Spokesperson)
Cell: +27 82 216 7664

 

BLF says Zwane ke Bosso!

BLF says Zwane ke Bosso!

Today the Mineral Resources Minister, Mosebenzi Zwane, announced the most radical policy statement since 1994. The Mining Charter launched today is a brave and clear statement in the quest to return the stolen wealth of the nation back to black hands. Minister Zwane deserves nothing but the unwavering support of our people in the struggle to realize Radical Economic Transformation.

Black First Land First (BLF) supports the Mining Charter as a minumim program upon which the total reclamation of the economy can be realised. BLF would have loved an even higher percentage that is in line with its own policy directive. BLFs position is that of democratizing the economy via nationalization of 100% of the commanding heights which will in turn translate into direct ownership by the people. The State in this context will only regulate the collective ownership of the people.

However, we recognize that the measures contained in the Mining Charter are not at variance with the BLF position on mineral and natural resources policy. The only difference is the quantum of the ownership announced. We have to defend these minimums and escalate ownership as part of the consolidation of the transformation process.

Some of the more revolutionary provisions of the Mining Charter is the call for 30% black ownership in 12 months. This provision is even more revolutionary if we consider the fact that in 23 years, not even 5% black ownership has been achieved in the mining sector. It’s a brave and significant pronouncement in law. It shows genuine leadership to prescribe such a clear period upon which the target must be met.

Also, the Mining Charter prescribes that for all new licencing for mining, only applicants with 50% black ownership would be considered. This is another revolutionary measure which overnight would force white monopoly capital to transform if it wants new prospecting rights. Also the Charter legislates that 70% of the goods used in the mining sector must come from black suppliers. Furthermore regarding mining boards, 50% must be black and women representation must be 25%.

Also the communities, where mining is conducted, must be allocated 8% and the workers get an additional 8% stake. This is a revolutionary policy proposal which sets out direct ownership by the workers and the communities. Perhaps the most innovative and smart provision is that 1% turn over in the mining sector must go to blacks. This is the best way to beat compliance avoidance because turn over can’t be manipulated. The mining sector has over a trillion rand annual turn over. Now black people would benefit directly from this over and above any dividend declared etc. Minister Zwane has outdone himself in service of black people. These measures must be defended against all the reactionary forces representing white monopoly capital.

BLF notes the silence of the Charter on the Zama Zama miners. This is an area that needs clarification and strengthening. The Mining Charter is a good starting point for the transformation of the sector away from its colonial nature. Minister Zwane has given the best tribute to the warriors of June 16, 1976. They didn’t die in vain!

BLF calls on society to defend and further advance the provisions of the Mining Charter. Minister Mosebenzi Zwane has shown great leadership and vision. We are not surprised that the criminal cartel known as the Chamber of Mines has boycotted the launch of the charter. Furthermore, we are not fazed by the economic terrorism of the so called markets. The time for Radical Economic Transformation is now! Viva Minister Zwane o Bosso wena!

ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL COORDINATING COMMITTEE OF THE BLACK FIRST LAND FIRST MOVEMENT (BLF NCC)

15 June 2017

Contact Details
Black First Land First Mail: [email protected]¬≠gmail.com

Zanele Lwana
(National Spokesperson)
Cell: +27799867225

Lindsay Maasdorp
(National Spokesperson)
Cell: +27 79 915 2957

Brian Tloubatla
(Deputy National Spokesperson)
Cell: +27 82 216 7664

BLF calls for action against the corrupt Pravin Gordhan

BLF calls for action against the corrupt Pravin Gordhan

Black First Land First (BLF) calls on the ruling party, the African National Congress (ANC), to take immediate action against the former Minister of Finance Pravin Gordhan for his involvement in acts of corruption in the Treasury amounting to over R4 billion. The Ann7 expose’ on the corruption in Treasury is based on an audit report of the same Treasury which has been kept under the carpet since last year.

BLF believes that the reason why the report had not been made public is because Gordhan and his acolytes in Treasury attempted to cover up this corruption involving the theft of billions of rands of public money. To this end we believe that Gordhan is in parliament to continue the cover up of corruption in cahoots with white monopoly capital – his business partners across many complex shareholding schemes. In this context, we call on the ruling party to immediately suspend Pravin Gordhan from parliament. We also call for the suspension of all the senior managers in Treasury who were in office at the time that the crimes were committed

BLF will also lay criminal charges against Gordhan and his partners in crime. It’s a serious indictment on the former Minister of Finance that a major corruption scandal by white monopoly capital has implicated him. Gordhan is corrupt, conflicted and compromised.

BLF wishes to applaud Ann7 for a credible balanced and fact based expose’ of the corruption in Treasury involving over four billion rand. BLF also notes the silence of the usual loud, but fake, crusaders against corruption.

Issued by Black First Land First, National Coordinating Committee (BLF NCC)

30 May 2017

Contact details

Black First Land First Email:[email protected]
Facebook: Black First Land First | Twitter: @black1stland1st
Website: www.blf.org.za

Zanele Lwana
(National Spokesperson)
Cell: +27 79 986 7225

Lindsay Maasdorp
(National Spokesperson)
Cell: +27 79 915 2957

Brian Tloubatla
(Deputy National Spokesperson)
Cell: +27 82 216 7664